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SEPTEMBER 2013 FYI FOR PETS SAKE

Published: September 5, 2013

YOUR ELECTRONIC MONTHLY NEWSLETTER FROM SYLVANIAVET ABOUT ANIMAL HEALTH AND OFFICE EVENTS

Please remember to give your dog and cat its monthly heartworm, flea and internal parasite control preventive

IN THIS ISSUE: NEW DOCTOR, POOCH PLUNGE, K-SICCA, EXAM ROOM CHANGES AND MORE

What’s inside this issue:

  1. Dr. Tiffany Cole
  2. Pooch Plunge
  3. Puppy Development Classes
  4. Common Eye Disease
  5. Cat Exam Rooms
  6. Topical Prevention
  7. Recent Cases
  8. Recent Departures
  9. Dr. Bob’s Vet Meet
  10. Vet and Children
  11. Corona Virus
  12. Andy’s Army Walk
  13. Sylvania Fall Festival
  14. Santa Pictures
  15. Vet Medicine
  16. Holding Pets in Exam Rooms

WE WOULD LIKE TO WELCOME TO OUR STAFF DR TIFFANY COLE!

For the last three years Dr. Tiffany has been Captain Tiffany Cole, US Army Veterinary Corps. We are honored to have a member of the armed services that give so much to ensure our freedom as a member of our staff. Dr. Cole is from Sylvania and is very excited to be coming home and joining the staff at SylvaniaVET. Dr. Tiffany graduated from The Ohio State University veterinary school in 2010. Prior to admission to OSU she did her undergrad at the University of Findlay. Dr. Tiffany mentored with us during her undergraduate school breaks. Dr. Jen wrote a letter of recommendation for Tiffany when she applied to vet school. We are so excited to have her back and bring our veterinary staffing back to seven doctors.

THE SECOND ANNUAL POOCH PLUNGE

will take place on Sunday, September 8, 2013 from 1-4pm at Plummer Pool, on Maplewood, in Sylvania. The pool will be open for dogs to swim while guests can bid on silent auction items and visit other vendors set up around the pool. Admission is just $5 per dog and all proceeds will benefit Toledo Unleashed, the non-profit organization dedicated to bringing the first off-leash dog park to the Toledo area. We will have an information booth with staff at this event.

PUPPY DEVELOPMENT AND BASIC OBEDIENCE CLASSES ARE ALWAYS FORMING.

The next set of classes, run by our well seasoned trainer, Doug, will be Puppy Development beginning on September 3rd and Basic Obedience starting on September 21st. Doug’s approach to training is what we call Pawsative Obedience Training. Very little to no negative discipline is used to teach his pupils and their families how to be a great dog. However, it is important to understand that some dogs are far more rambunctious and unruly than others so a firmer hand and command may be necessary. It a dog is too disruptive or requires strong leadership the family may be asked to engage Doug for private lessons before returning to class. Class instruction is important for all obedience training, as learning to obey with the distractions of other humans and dogs is critical to having a well behaved pet. Even before attending a puppy class it is critical that the family start teaching a puppy right from wrong. Like children, puppies need to know the rules and the family’s limits. We encourage you to teach your puppy to sit on command and then use this command to make it earn everything. The phrase “good dogs sit for attention” is one Dr. Bob uses in his puppy training discussions at every first puppy visit.

KERATOCONJUCTIVITIS sicca is a moderately common eye disease in mostly middle aged dogs.

Brachiocephalic breeds like, Pugs, Shiz Tzu, with pronounced, bulging eyes are at more risk. Sicca is a condition of reduced and inadequate tear production. No one is certain why dogs develop sicca but immune disease affecting the tear (lacrimal) glands is thought to play a huge role. A dog with sicca may have thick, ropy, infected mucous accumulate in and around the eyes. Pigment changes, secondary to chronic corneal inflammation because of dryness usually occurs. We use a test called Schirmer Tear Test to evaluate tear production. If the test is below 15 mm in one minute, then treatment must start. A variety of medications including steroids, antibiotic drops, cyclosporine, Optixcare and artificial tears are recommend and prescribed. In most cases sicca is a chronic problem that requires regular daily treatment for the rest of the pet’s life. If diagnosed early, serious complications like pigment induced blindness where the cornea is too dense with black pigment for the pet to see through, corneal ulcers and pain can be avoided. In selected cases there is a surgery that can be preformed to bring saliva as a moisturizer into the eye. The Parotid Salivary duct is transplanted from the mouth to the eye to provide corneal lubrication.

WE HAVE BEEN GETTING LOTS OF COMMENTS RECENTLY ABOUT A COUPLE SMALL CHANGES IN OUR CAT EXAM ROOMS.

One is the great murals that have been painted in cat exam rooms 1,2,3. The artist, Julia Johnston did a great job of bringing color and art into each room. No cats have commented, but owners sure like the murals! The change which cats seem to enjoy, is the addition of pads to the exam tables. Owners have noticed that their pets sit more quietly and seem less stressed when on the pad. Both of these changes are part of our Gold Standard Cat Friendly Practice membership. We are still the only area practice with this designation. The American Association of Feline Practitioners who administers the Cat Friendly Practice program strongly emphasizes that all cats, regardless of age or lifestyle, have at least one wellness visit and exam EVERY YEAR.

TOPICAL FLEA AND TICK PRODUCTS THAT CONTAIN MORE THAN 30% PERMETHRINS OR PERMETHRIN LIKE PRODUCTS PRESENT SERIOUS TOXICITY RISKS TO PETS.

We have never been a big fan of using topical permethrins on a pet because of the toxicity effect. The facts that it can be toxic to humans as well and they have very poor staying power add to our concern. Heat, light and air cause the pyrethrum and its partner permethrin to break down. Every year we look at our flea and tick recommendations and do the home work for you. If you have questions about any product we will be happy to tell you why we recommend it or do not suggest it to be used.

WE HAVE HAD A COUPLE CASES RECENTLY THAT ARE WORTH TALKING ABOUT.

An 8 month old Bull Mastiff puppy was presented with a large bone lodged in its esophagus. Attempts to push it into the stomach failed, the bone was just too big. The next day we tried to remove the bone with our flexible endoscope. Again it was too big for any instrument that could fit through the working channel of the scope. It was then decided that we would have to open the esophagus to remove the foreign body. To do this, it was necessary to open the chest, have a registered veterinary technician breath for the dog, isolate the esophagus, make an incision and extract the bone. If you would like to see the bone, go to SylvaniaVET’s face book page where it is posted. After three days of post surgical hospitalization, the dog was sent home! At this time, all sutures are out and he is doing great. Our willingness to tackle a very difficult surgery and provide the 24/7 post surgical care is what made this case a great success. Our fee was less than ½ the specialty clinics estimate for the procedure.
Two puppies were presented from Planned Pethood with concern that they had been intentionally burned. They were virtually hairless with red, raw skin. Fortunately, the problem was not a burn, but severe generalized demodetic mange. This mange is a small parasite that lives in the hair follicle. When it multiplies, hair falls out and the skin can become red. The mange is sometimes called red mange for this reason. Treatment was started with oral Ivermectin. As the puppies were mixed breeds and some breeds have been known to be sensitive to Ivermectin we encountered a complication. The puppies began to show signs of Ivermectin toxicity. Treatment was started immediately and they have made a full recover. We would like to thank Animal Emergency and Critical Care of Toledo for providing a unit of IV lipids which we did not have. The lipids helped clear the Ivermectin from the puppy’s bodies. Thanks Dr. Kittsen McCumber and your crew!

WE WANT TO SAY GOOD-BYE TO A FEW OF OUR STAFF MEMBERS THAT HAVE LEFT SYLVANIAVET RECENTLY.

Sarah from boarding has left to prepare for the adoption of a child that she and her husband have been anticipating for a long time. Sarah will occasionally fill in and she is still doing Zumba classes. Jenna, a veterinary assistant, has left to attend college in Saginaw, MI. Mark, client relations, has taken a job related to his college major with BMW in Columbus. Shannon, veterinary assistant, has returned to vet school at Ohio State. She will be a sophomore. Matt, veterinary assistant, let to be with his girl friend in Port Huron, MI. And finally, Kelly from client relations left us to pursue a job in finance. These departures are a normal part of veterinary practice. Working for a vet is frequently a stepping stone to a person’s full time career. We are fortunate that we have a core group of staff members that have been with us for years. We are grateful for their loyalty!

DR BOB ATTENDED A FOUR DAY VETERINARY MEETING LATE LAST MONTH.

Held annually in Kansas City the CVC meeting provides a large variety of classes. Dr. Bob attended behavior, feline medicine, feline enrichment, soft tissue surgery classes and others. He tries to get something useful out of every session and he claims this years meeting was no exception.

MANY YOUNG PEOPLE COME TO US WITH THE IDEA THEY WANT TO BE A VET.

Often the parents are the ones making the statement that their child loves animals and wants to be a vet. We welcome the opportunity to expose young students to the veterinary profession. We try to show them the many pluses, but also expose them to the concerns. Right now the profession is in a serious quandary with no solution in site. The problem is not how hard it is to get into school. It is not how difficult the classes are. It has nothing to do with the fact that classes are at least 75% women. Rather, it is all about finances and job opportunities. One must have completed all the college prerequisites before applying to vet school. For many students that means student loans for their undergraduate schooling. Vet school is four years and can add a huge amount to the student debt load. The average graduate has $150,000 of debt, and it is not rare that the number is $250,000 or more at graduation. New graduate vets make between $65,000-$70,000 in their first job. If they chose to take an internship they will make about half that much. WE know one graduate that was going to do an internship in New York City. The pay for the year’s internship was not enough to cover living expenses. A freshly minted DVM is now ready to work. The job market is not great and is projected to get worse. Why? Vet schools are increasing class sizes to increase revenue. This dilutes the student-teacher ratio but also makes the hunt for jobs more competitive. We encourage all young people interested in veterinary medicine to educate themselves and their family about the realities of the career.

FELINE INFECTIOUS PERITONITIS

is caused by the Corona virus. This virus is wide spread and common in all healthy cats. When a cat becomes ill with FIP there has been a mutation of the virus creating a pathogen. No one knows why the mutation occurs but stress is believed to be a major factor. There is no test that can specifically lead to the diagnosis of FIP. All the current tests are considered worthless and a waste of money. Recent findings at Cornell may lead to a molecular based test that will enable accurate diagnosis and ultimately a treatment. Right now cats with FIP are not easily diagnosed and there is not a tried and true treatment that will cure the disease.

ANDY’S ARMY WALK AND FUN RUN

is being held Sunday, September 22, 2013 at Side Cut Metropark in Maumee. This event will benefit Andy’s Army Canine Cancer Project, a non-profit organization dedicated to raising awareness of canine cancers and to donating money to help fund canine cancer research projects at the university level. Come join SylvaniaVET at this event! There will be many dog related vendors, a blessing of the animals, a search and rescue demonstration, raffles, door prizes and a tail gate party. Visit www.andy-army.org or Andy’s Army Canine Cancer Awareness Project on Facebook for more information or to register.

SYLVANIA FALL FESTIVAL AND PARADE

is scheduled for Sunday, October 20th. This annual event is one of our favorites to participate in and we invite all clients, friends and family to join us. Every year we have a themed float in the parade and ask everyone to join us with their pets in costume and walk in the parade. This year’s float theme will be “SylvaniaVET Zoo”. Staff members and their pooches will be dressed like zoo animals and we would love for everyone to put a costume on their pooches and join us! We will meet behind Northview High School at around noon. Everyone is welcome to join us. We will also have a booth on Main Street from 11am – 3pm and will have fun freebies to hand out, a game for your dog to play and an awesome gift basket to raffle off. Stop by and say hello to our staff while you’re enjoying a beautiful Sunday afternoon in Downtown Sylvania!

SANTA PICTURES WITH YOUR PET

will be back by popular demand this December. We will post soon with the date that we schedule and encourage everyone to sign up for this event. Our photographers take beautiful, studio quality photos and also have great options for greeting cards available to you. Look for more information coming soon.

VETERINARY MEDICINE IS A SCIENCE BASED PROFESSION IS A STATEMENT OF THE OBVIOUS.

However, many pet owners do not look at food production as a science but they should. Only companies that invest in the knowledge of animal nutrition are on the leading edge of the profession. We call these companies nutrition companies. There are only four companies doing the large majority of pet nutrition research, Hills, Iams, Royal Canin and Nestle’ Purina. To a much smaller degree Purina pet foods in St. Louis also does some research. All other companies are food manufacturers. They use knowledge that was published over 30 years ago to formulate their products. In many cases these products are of poor quality and over priced and over hyped. We recommend that you chose your pet’s food from the nutrition companies, not the manufacturers.
Nutrition science has made a huge breakthrough in the pet obesity category. Hills has developed a prescription diet, Metabolic Diet, which is a game changer in how pets lose weight. Attempts by all companies to create “lite” foods to reduce a pet’s weight have not worked very well. Metabolic diet has used developing knowledge about fat produced hormones to make pet weight loss more predictable and effective. The nutritionists at Hills have found a way to “turn on” fat burning genes that fat produced hormones have shut off. This means that Hills has overcome the self preservation goal of fat cells. We have several dozen dogs and cats on Metabolic Diet and have had great success. if you would like to read more about Metabolic Diet we have an article from Veterinary Product News available at the office. Ask for the METABOLIC DIET article.

MANY CLIENTS OFFER TO HOLD THEIR PETS IN THE EXAM ROOM.

We discourage this practice for the safety of all in the room. Our assistants are trained to properly restrain a pet with just the right amount of effort. Pets are often more co-operative when “mom” is right there. We do not want anyone to get hurt in the room but especially the client. If a pet is being difficult we will frequently use a muzzle. This can have a great calming effect on the dog or cat. We have lots of tricks to calm a pet and avoid injury to all. In special situations we will allow an owner to assist in the restraint of their pet. We almost always require the pet be muzzled in this situation. Remember, your safety as well as ours is the highest priority.

WELCOME DR TIFFANY COLE!

COME TO PLUMMERS POOL SEPTEMBER 8TH. SEE YOU AT THE OTHER EVENTS!

WE ALWAYS ACCEPT THE DONATION OF GENTLY USED TOWELS AND BLANKETS.

CALL FOR A RESERVATION 419-885-4421

THE CARING 24/7 STAFF OF SYLVANIAVET

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