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NOVEMBER 2014 FYI FOR PET'S SAKE

AN ELECTRONIC BLOG ABOUT PETS FOR PET LOVERS EVERYWHERE FROM SYLVANIAVET

Be sure to give your dogs and cats their monthly preventive medication

IN THIS ISSUE: BEST OF VOTING, SANTA-PET PICTURES, FALL TOXINS, EBOLA VIRUS, FDA INVESTIGATING TEAR STAIN PRODUCTS, AND LOTS MORE!

Remember to give heartworm and flea prevention to your dogs and cats once a month year round.

SylvaniaVET FYI Newsletter

11/2014

TOLEDO CITY PAPER'S ANNUAL BEST OF POLL IS UP AND RUNNING.

SylvaniaVET has held the honor of best vet in NW Ohio for seven consecutive years.

We want to make it a "crazy 8" and need your help. Please pick up a copy of the Toledo City Paper and fill out the published ballot or an easier way is to go on-line to www.toledocitypaper.com and fill out the electronic ballot.  Please follow the rules but have everyone you know vote SylvaniaVET as best vet and our groomers, Nancy and Katie, as best groomers.

SANTA-PET PICTURE SIGN UP HAS STARTED AT SYLVANIAVET.

We have lost track of how many years we have sponsored this fun holiday event but it has been over 20 years. We hope to get a jump on the many other opportunities that you can use to have a holiday picture taken with the jolly old man and your pet(s) by scheduling our day Sunday, November 23rd from 12-4 PM. Each sitting with our professional photographer, Gerri  Leonard, will cost $15 for a 5x7 digital, studio quality picture.  Other picture novelties including cards, key chains and buttons will be available at an additional cost. All proceeds from the sitting fee of $15 will be donated to our charitable foundation, Memories Live on Animal Foundation.  Call 419-885-4421 to reserve a time or stop in and sign up. Our goal is at least 100 sittings.

YEAR ROUND HEARTWORM, INTERNAL PARASITE CONTROL AND FLEA CONTROL IS RECOMMENDED BY THE COMPANION ANIMAL PARASITE COUNCIL REGARDLESS OF THE GEOGRAPHICAL AREA PET OWNERS LIVE IN.

We follow and endorse this recommendation with all our clients.  We have presented this information to you many times but one fact concerning heartworm protection needs to be emphasized. If heartworm prevention is stopped for the winter and not restarted until the next spring, it may take up to three months for your pet, dog and cat, to be fully protected with any of the monthly medications. This is due to an emerging new strain of heartworm and what is thought to a building resistance to preventive medications.  We still recommend the following products and feel that they have proven to be safe and effective over the course of many millions of doses: Trifexis, Heartgard Plus, Frontline Plus, Nexgard and Revolution.  We have been asked about the safety of Trifexis because some clients have read negative reports on the internet. We have carefully and thoroughly reviewed all the scientific information concerning Trifexis and have concluded it is safe and effective in dogs for which we have prescribed it. The negative press and internet comments are not unbiased, science based or accurate information.  If you would like a copy of an extensive explanation from Elanco,  just ask for a TRIFEXIS HAND OUT.

THE PET POISON HELPLINE HAS PUBLISHED A LIST OF THE MOST COMMON FALL AND WINTER TOXINS FOUND AROUND YOUR HOUSE.

The list includes CHOCOLATE; remember  this toxicity is based on three factors, size of the pet, the quality of the chocolate and the amount eaten by the pet. HOLIDAY TABLE FOOD poses no direct toxicity unless it includes grapes and raisins. However, excessive fatty food can cause conditions from GI upset to severe pancreatitis. Also remember, desserts that contain Xylitol, can be severely toxic to dogs. MOUSE AND RAT POISONS placed up in the house because our little rodent friends are looking for a warm space to spend the winter. These toxins can cause severe illness and death in dogs and cats. Most of these rodenticides are anticoagulants and can cause spontaneous fatal bleeding in our pet should they ingest a toxic amount.  MUSHROOMS seem to flourish in the damp cool weather of fall. Many of these fungus plants are harmless but some can be extremely toxic. We have seen several cases of mushroom toxicity this fall. COMPOST BINS OR PILES can be extremely toxic and attractive to dogs particularly. The good intentions of composting our organic waste can be overwhelmed should your pet get access to the highly fermented and spoiled contents of your compost. Be sure to securely close a compost bin or fence off a compost pile.

We would add to the list:

ANTIFREEZE, POTPOURRI, LILLY FLOWERS OF ALL TYPES, MANY SEASONAL PLANTS AND SOME OF THE WATER ADDITIVES USED TO PROLONG THE "LIFE" OF YOUR CUT CHRISTMAS TREE.

EBOLA VIRUS HAS GOTTEN A LOT OF ATTENTION LATELY.

Much of the information and reaction to the reports has bordered on hysteria. Ebola is not new, it has had outbreaks in Africa many times over the last several decades. The US and Europe has been lucky that it has not reached our boarders before. We have always held the CDC in high regard, but their handling of the Ebola issue leads to questions of their independence from political pressure and their decision making. The CDC should have been the point of the spear in dealing with the presence of the virus in our country. Unfortunately they seemed to be playing catch up from day one.  One good sign concerning Ebola is that none of the passengers on the plane that transported the Liberian man to Texas have developed the disease.  Other cases have all been health care workers that had contact with this man or those medical professionals that were in Africa dealing directly with Ebola infected patients. There appears to be little or no risk to our pets from Ebola. The spaniel of the Texas nurse has been well cared for and studied and is about to be released from isolation. We have a published article from DVM News about Ebola risk.

SHOULD WE HAVE A WINTER THAT APPROACHES THAT OF LAST YEAR WE WOULD LIKE YOU TO KNOW THAT WE ARE PLANNING FOR THE POSSIBILITY.

SylvaniaVET is a 24/7 veterinary hospital, not a part time pet clinic or daytime hospital. As a result we will always be open and staffed. Even a level three emergency will not cause us to close. We consider our mission as critical to our patients as the mission of any area human hospital. Sick or injured animals should not have to wait for a snow emergency to lift. If you can safely travel and your pet needs emergency care, we will be open and ready for you.  Tell your friends and colleagues that they can call 419-885-4421 any time day or night during a snow emergency and we will see them. This is an exception to our mission of providing emergency care for only our clients of record.

PET HEALTH INSURANCE IS A HEALTH CARE PRODUCT WE RECOMMEND YOU CONSIDER.

Advanced care and prolonged pet medicine and surgery can be expensive. Pet health insurance is a method of lessening the impact of this care on your budget. There are many companies but we recommend none of them specifically as we feel each meets a slightly different niche. You must do your research and decide exactly what services you want covered and how much you are willing to spend. Remember, the more comprehensive the coverage, the higher the premium. One item worth considering is a policy that does not exclude hereditary conditions, like hip dysplasia.  Recently, the oldest pet health insurance company, VPI, became affiliated with Nationwide insurance. This higher profile with a large insurance company should make pet health insurance more visible to the pet owning population.

ANNUAL WELLNESS HEALTH APPOINTMENTS FOR EVERY CAT ARE ESSENTIAL TO THE WELL BEING OF YOUR CAT.

It does not matter if your cat is a roamer or strictly indoor living on the 10th floor of a high rise, it needs a yearly visit. Vaccines are secondary and should be discussed during this visit. The vaccines should not drive the visit, they should be a back seat passenger. A 5 ½ year study by Zoetis that involved 1197 clients at 264 veterinary hospitals showed some interesting facts.  Nine percent of cat owners indicated their cats had difficulty breathing and 11% thought their cats showed stiffness or lameness when moving. Only 22% thought their cats were overweight or obese. This is way under what represents the reality of the pet cats weight issues. Chronic vomiting or hairballs were reported in 27% of cats. Lab testing showed that 25% of the cats had abnormal test values indicating possible liver, kidney or infection.  You will be hearing more from us as it comes to annual wellness testing in both our dog and cat patients.

NEW VACCINES TO PREVENT METASTISIS OF OSTEOSARCOMA AND FELINE MAMMARY CANCER WILL BE AVAILABLE TO PET OWNERSIN THE US SOON.

The vaccines target a tumor protein that shuts down the growth of the tumor which prevents these highly malignant tumors from spreading to other tissues. The US provider of these vaccines is Veterinary Oncology Services of Middletown, NY. We will be investigating the availability and use of these vaccines.

FDA IS REVIEWING THE CLAIMS AND EFFICACY OF TEAR-STAIN PRODUCTS.

Three products, Angels' Eyes, Angels' Glow and Pet's Glow and exported products Glow Groom and Health Glow are being looked at. All products contain an antibiotic not approved for dogs or cats. None of the manufacturers have ever submitted safety and effectiveness studies to the FDA.

THE AMENDED ANIMAL WELFARE ACT HAS RESTRICTED THE IMPORTATION OF PUPPIES UNDER SIX MONTHS OF AGE INTO THE U.S.

These are puppies that are intended for resale, research or veterinary purposes. Puppies less than six months of age will be permitted to be imported if they are a personal pet, breeding stock or a show or training dog.

DR NATALIE IS HEADING FOR MATERNITY LEAVE BEFORE THE END OF THIS MONTH.

She has been a real trooper during her pregnancy. When she delivers her second child we will notify everyone about this happy event. We expect her to take her full 12 week maternity leave. In her absence we will all happily  pick up a few extra hours and on-call nights. GOOD LUCK DR NATALIE, JJ AND GAVIN.

SYLVANIA ADVANTAGE NEWSPAPER DID A VERY NICE ARTICLE ON DR BOB AND SYLVANIAVET.

Through a misunderstanding between the reporter and the staff member that gave her a tour,  was mistakenly stated that we have a dental specialist on staff.  Though many of the doctors and techs on staff have a strong interested in dental care, we do not have a legally defined dental specialist. We want to make it very clear that being interested and doing lots of dental work including root canals does not qualify us to be called specialists.  The first issue of the Advantage in November will issue a clarifying retraction for this inadvertent error. Thanks Advantage for highlighting SylvaniaVET.

VPI PET HEALTH INSURANCE HAS ISSUED THEIR 2014 MOST WACKY CAT AND ZANY DOG NAMES.

We find it fun and entertaining to ask clients how they came to name their pets. Dr. Bob has had a Heather, he and Carols first pet, which they later wished they had kept the name for when they started having children. Oh well, they named their only daughter Tricia. Next came Keeper, oh dad can't we keep her. Keeper was a make.

Then a Cairn Terrier named Decker after the US distance runner Mary Decker. Then comes Shanni, named after the Red Wing Brendan Shannahan. Finally, Tressie named after you got it, Jim Tressel of OSU football fame. How about you, can you match the VPI list? Cats: Snuggles Butt Le Lee, Count Flufferton, Katy Purry, Joey Bannana Pants. Felix thunder paws, Nuttykitty, Senor Meow, Sassy Brat Cat, Purrscilla. Dogs: Peanut Wigglebutt, Sir Hog Knucklehead, Sasha Biggeiepotamus Fierce, Otto Blitzschnell von Longdog, Zippity Do Dawg.  Airbubble Mc Muffin, Hamburger Patty, Angus T, Brackencrack, Mister Buddy  Pickles, Waffle Dots. That is a bunch of silly, out there names.

HAVE A GREAT THANKSGIVING

THE GRATEFUL AND DEDICATED STAFF OF SYLVANIAVET

WE WILL BE CLOSED THANKSGIVING DAY BUT DR. JEN IS ON CALL AND MEMBERS OF OUR ANIMAL LOVING TEAM WILL BE THERE FOR YOU 24/7. WE WILL BE OPEN FOR REGULAR BUSINESS HOURS ON FRIDAY AND SATURDAY.

REMEMBER TO:

CALL OR STOP IN FOR A SITTING TIME FOR SANTA-PET PICTURES

419-885-4421

VOTE IN THE BEST OF POLL FOR BEST VET AND BEST GROOMER:

SYLVANIAVET OF COURSE!

WWW.TOLEDOCITYPAPER.COM

BY 5 PM DECEMBER 3rd

WE NEED YOUR HELP

A BALLOT WILL BE PUBLISHED IN EACH EDITION UNTIL DEC 3rd.

SylvaniaVET FYI Newsletter

Bonus Edition (Nov. 2014)

THE GREAT PYRENEES

The Pyrenees Mountains form a natural border between Southern France and Northern Spain.  It is in this rough terrain that two distinct dog breeds were developed by the Basque people.  The Basques' culture centered on sheepherding and farming in the mountains.  They needed a way to protect their sheep and land from native bears and wolves.  They also needed a way to move their herds from one pasture to another in difficult topography and difficult climate.  Over centuries, the Basque created the Great Pyrenees as a livestock guardian dog and the Pyrenean Shepherd as a livestock herding dog. The two breeds could not be any more different.

The Great Pyrenees is considered to be a giant breed with females ranging in weight from 80-90 pounds and males as large as110 pounds.  They are a double-coated breed with a soft, downy undercoat and coarse, long outer coat that is predominately white.  Their efficient gait and generally relaxed demeanor belies their quiet strength.  Pyrs, as they are often called, are large enough to handle themselves against a bear or wolf, but with agility to maneuver in the battle for their charges, sheep.  On average, they would patrol a pasture of several hundred acres for any predator, barking along the way to announce their presence.  Pyrs would do this for a couple of weeks on their own, without the aid of a human.  They were bred to be independent thinkers and workers.  Since Pyrs are still used for this original livestock guardian purpose, that independent attitude and vocal barking are still hallmarks in the breed. Take note:  these are not large Goldens!  They do not make a good dog for someone who is used to a breed that listens.  Pyrs cannot be boundary trained and must be confined in a fenced in area and never off a leash when not fenced.  Even the most accomplished Pyrs with obedience titles compete in an indoor area.  They are not an active breed, but more inclined to let things roll unless they are needed.

The Great Pyrenees work in tandem with the Pyrenean Shepherd.  This breed is the smallest of the four French herding dogs: the Bouvier, the Briard, the Picardy Shepherd and the "Pyr Shep."  Pyr Sheps are relatively rare in the USA.  They were just recognized by the AKC in 2009.  Out of the AKC's 180 recognized breeds, they rank 169th in registration standings.  This is a slight breed, only getting to be 30 pounds at the highest end of the spectrum and 15 pounds at the low end.  They should be lean and lithe in body.  As laid back as a Pyr is, the Pyr Shep is just as energetic!  Their job is to move hundreds and sometimes thousands of sheep across rocky and steep ground.  They have a laser-sharp focus to keep all of their charges in check and on the move.  It is their job to acknowledge a silent signal from the Great Pyrenees that it is time to move, and complete that task very quickly.  The land is usually owned by the head of a family and worked by subservient family members.  Much of the time, a working shepherd's only property was that of his devoted Pyr Shep.   As with Great Pyrenees, Pyr Sheps are still used for this purpose, and develop strong bonds with their owners, often to the exclusion of others.  Those that share their lives with a Pyr Shep must continually socialize their dog well beyond the puppy stage to ensure that their dog will accept others in the family and home.  These little dogs excel in performance events like agility and flyball.  An active family is a must for Pyr Sheps.

The dynamic between the two breeds creates interesting personalities besides being independent or energetic.  As a herding breed, Pyr Sheps can be hyper if their energy is not channeled and can be prey driven.  That means that squirrels need to be on guard around Pyr Sheps, as well as cats and birds in the home.  The Great Pyrenees walks a fine line with what they will tolerate and what they won't.  They are naturally protective of smaller animals:  they had to have a rock solid temperament around lambs and the Pyr Sheps that were treasures to the Basque.  On the other hand, they are naturally dog aggressive to other large dogs, since they were bred to protect sheep against wolves.  It seems that around 50 pounds tops their tolerance for another breed.  Pyrs are quite accommodating with cats, birds and rodent pets like guinea pigs.

It is interesting to note that both breeds share double dewclaws on the hind legs.  It is a must-have for Great Pyrenees and is one way to distinguish Pyrs from other white livestock guardians like the Hungarian Kuvasz.  Most Pyr Sheps also have these extra toes, but not always.  If present in either breed, these toes are functional and help in rough terrain.  They are not just hanging by flaps of skin as in other dogs.  These toes are attached with profuse nerves, vessels and tissue.  Both breeds' national clubs advise against removing these dewclaws because it is an involved surgery with prolonged recovery time.  It is important to remember, though, that these nails do not get as much wear as the other nails.  These nails may have to be cut more often than the others to prevent the nails from growing into the toe pad.

Both breeds also share a coat type that is pretty easy to maintain.  A thorough brushing to the skin in a Pyr is generally all it needs to be kept tidy.  As long as their coat is the proper texture, mud falls right out when it dries.  Pyr Sheps come in two coat types:  a rough-face coat that is longer in length and a smooth-face coat that is a bit shorter.  Both coat types just need a weekly brushing to keep them smelling fresh and prevent mats.  Neither breed produces a lot of oil in comparison to breeds like Labs and Beagles.  Less oil in their coat equates to less bathing as long as they are brushed regularly.

While drastically different types of dogs, the Great Pyrenees and the Pyrenean Shepherd are excellent examples of how people have developed breeds to help their daily tasks.  Neither breed is perfect for everyone, but both offer qualities that bring a lot to the table.

HAVE A GREAT THANKSGIVING FROM

THE GRATEFUL AND DEDICATED STAFF OF SYLVANIAVET!

WE WILL BE CLOSED THANKSGIVING DAY BUT DR. JEN IS ON CALL AND MEMBERS OF OUR ANIMAL LOVING TEAM WILL BE THERE FOR YOU 24/7. WE WILL BE OPEN FOR REGULAR BUSINESS HOURS ON FRIDAY AND SATURDAY.

REMINDER:

SANTA-PET PICTURES ARE NOVEMBER 23

CALL OR STOP IN TODAY TO ARRANGE A TIME

419-885-4421

TOLEDO CITY PAPER "BEST OF" VOTING IS GOING ON NOW!

VOTE SYLVANIAVET FOR BEST VET & BEST GROOMER

WWW.TOLEDOCITYPAPER.COM

BY 5 PM DECEMBER 3rd

WE NEED YOUR HELP

A BALLOT WILL BE PUBLISHED IN EACH EDITION UNTIL DEC 3rd.

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